10 Principles of Defending People: (#5 All Eyes are Equal & #4 Know the Enemy)

June 6, 2018

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

I’m going over to me what are the top ten principles of defending people.  To recap the list so far:

#5 All Eyes are Equal:

People don’t trust themselves or their own judgment for some reason.  Lawyers included.

Maverick trusted himself.  He hit the brakes and the MIG flew right by.  He had cunning, creativity, and self-assurance to know the maneuver would work.  The fact it hadn’t been done before didn’t bother him.

What I like about Maverick is he didn’t ask anyone’s permission.  He just trusted himself and to a lesser degree wasn’t afraid to fail.  I’m a pretty far cry from Maverick, but I hope I think like he might every now and again.

When I say all eyes are equal what I mean is if a trial theory makes sense to me then chances are it makes sense to the jurors too.  If I think the police and prosecutors are reaching then I ask myself why?  Maybe they’ve been suckered by a doe-eyed accuser in a sexual assault case…  Maybe they’re blinded by my client’s appearance or problems they’ve had in the past… or maybe they’re so trapped in their own narrative, they can’t see they’re in an echo chamber as in some domestic violence cases.

Too often, lawyers will settle into a conventional defense.  They are afraid to think outside of the box.  But by thinking inside the box, they turn themselves into fish in a barrel waiting to be speared.  Remember all eyes — including the lawyers own — are equal.  The big picture makes sense.

Don’t be afraid to tell the jury about the big picture.  Don’t be afraid of hitting the brakes so the MIG can fly right by.

#4 Know the Enemy: 

The key to knowing your opponent in my book is experience, experience, experience.

I remember how I thought as a prosecutor.  It helps me today.  I was advocating for the opposite position which is something lawyers do.  I remember my thought process in trying to prove-up a case.  I remember my areas of emphasis to the jury, the assumptions I’d make in each case, and the points of emphasis to the jurors.  I also remember how effective defense lawyers would attack my case.

Defending cases are wonderful learning experiences too.

Cross examining hundreds of police officers teaches you how to control a sophisticated witness who is often trying intentionally to personally subvert you in front of a jury.  Mountains of experience teaches you how to strike the precise blows you need to inflict with your questioning without picking losing battles, having your message bogged down, or looking like a jerk.

Experience also teaches you the prosecutor’s playbook.  Prosecutors across the state share practices and training (as do defense lawyers) so it’s not uncommon to see the same techniques and arguments in different counties.  An experienced defense lawyer needs to know what is coming and how to neutralize, spoil, or blow-up certain tactics they ought to expect are coming.  It’s no different than a football team watching tape on their upcoming opponent and figuring out how to defend against certain plays or formations.

Knowing the enemy is important — but it can’t be confused with a winning strategy.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas.

 

 

 


Quick Chart of Texas Sex Offender Registration Crimes

May 17, 2018

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

Chapter 62 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure governs sex offender registration.  Since it reads like any other government code — I’ve listed them in an easier to digest manner and provided links where the law gets really tricky:

Lifetime Registration:

  • Continuous Sexual Abuse of a Young Child Children
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child
  • Indecency with a child (by contact)
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault
  • Sexual Assault
  • Possession of Child Pornography
  • Promotion of Child Pornography
  • Sexual performance of a child
  • Trafficking offenses in certain circumstances
  • Burglary with intent to commit sex crime
  • Compelling prostitution of a child younger than 18
  • Unlawful restraint of child under 17 when already registering
  • Prohibited sexual conduct (incest)
  • Federal offense or offense from other state which is substantially similar

10 Year Registration

  • Indecency with a child (by exposure)
  • Unlawful restraint of a child under 17
  • Online solicitation of a minor
  • Prostitution (hiring prostitute under 18)
  • Indecent Exposure, 2nd Offense (must be convictions, not deferred)
  • Federal offense or state offense from another state with is substantially similar

*Deferred adjudication will trigger registration unless otherwise listed above.

**Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas. For legal advice about any situation you should contact an attorney directly.

 

 

 

 


Indecent Exposure

December 30, 2010

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

(972) 369-0577

www.rosenthalwadas.com

There are very few allegations more humiliating than indecent exposure.

Texas Penal Code 21.08 governs Indecent Exposure and that statute holds, “A person commits an offense if he exposes his anus or any part of his genitals with intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person, and he is reckless about whether another is present who will be offended or alarmed by his act.”

Though indecent exposure is a relatively minor charge, a class b misdemeanor, it can have stigmatizing long-term effects.  Additionally, multiple indecent exposure convictions can result in sex offender registration under Chapter 62 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure.  As such — any indecent exposure charge is an extremely serious one!

Indecent exposure allegations are highly fact and evidence intensive.  Furthermore these cases are highly subjective.  Fighting these charges requires an aggressive attorney that is an experienced trial lawyer and is extremely thorough with the facts.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas. Nothing in this article is intended to be legal advice.  For legal advice about any specific situation, you should consult an attorney directly.

 


Texas Criminal Punishment Levels

June 25, 2010

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

(972) 369-0577

www.rosenthalwadas.com

Offense Levels in Texas (updated as of January, 2018):

Class C Misdemeanors:  Punishable by a fine not to exceed $500:

  • Traffic offenses
  • Assault by contact
  • Drug paraphernalia
  • Disorderly conduct (other than firearm related)
  • Theft under $100 (unless theft committed by check)
  • Insufficient funds
  • Minor in possession (MIP)
  • Minor in Consumption

Class B Misdemeanors: Fine not to exceed $2,000 and not more than 180 days confinement in county jail:

  • DWI (72 hours minimum jail; 6 days minimum with open container)
  • Possession of Marijuana (less than 2 oz.)
  • Theft over $100 but less than $750
  • Theft by check (over $20 but less than $500)
  • Criminal mischief over $100 but less than $750 (vandalism)
  • Violation of a protective order
  • Indecent exposure
  • Racing on a public road
  • Prostitution
  • Disorderly Conduct with Firearms (display or discharge)

Class A Misdemeanors:  Fine not to exceed $4,000 and not more than 180 days confinement in county jail:

  • DWI (2nd offense) (minimum 72-hours jail)
  • DWI over 0.15 BAC
  • Possession of marijuana (between 2 oz. and 4 oz.)
  • Possession of dangerous drugs (usually the possession of legal drugs without a valid prescription)
  • Assault causing bodily injury
  • Theft between $750 and $2,500 (whether by check or otherwise)
  • Criminal mischief over $750 but less than $2,500
  • Evading on foot

State Jail Felonies:  Fine not to exceed $10,000 and confinement in state jail institution for no less than 180 days and no more than 2 years.

  • Possession of controlled substance less than 1 gram (typically methamphetamine, cocaine or heroin)
  • Credit card abuse (using another person’s credit card without authorization)
  • Third theft conviction of any amount
  • Theft between $2,500 and $30,000
  • Forgery
  • DWI with a minor under the age of 15 in the vehicle
  • Evading with a vehicle
  • Car Theft (Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle)

Third Degree Felonies:  Fine not to exceed $10,000 and confinement in Texas Department of Corrections for no less than 2 years and no more than 10 years.

  • Possession of controlled substance between 1 and 4 grams;
  • Aggravated assault
  • Assault causing bodily injury (enhanced from prior finding of family violence)
  • Burglary of a building
  • Theft between $30,000 and $150,000
  • DWI (3rd offense)
  • Indecency with a child (by exposure)
  • Solicitation of a minor

Second Degree Felonies: Fine not to exceed $10,000 and confinement in Texas Department of Corrections for no less than 2 years and no more than 20 years:

  • Possession of a controlled substance over 4 grams but less than 200 grams
  • Burglary of a habitation
  • Aggravated assault with a deadly weapon
  • Theft between $150,000 and $300,000
  • Indecency with a child (by contact)
  • Injury to a child
  • Sexual Assault of a Child (Under 17 but not 14)
  • Sexual Assault
  • Attempted murder
  • Intoxicated manslaughter

First Degree Felony:  Fine not to exceed $10,000 and confinement in Texas Department of Corrections for no less than 5 years and no more than 99 years.

  • Murder
  • Possession of a controlled substance over 200 grams
  • Possession of a controlled substance between 4 and 200 grams with intent to distribute
  • Arson
  • Theft over $300,000
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child under 6 (25 – Life w/o Parole)
  • Continuous Sexual Abuse of a Child or Young Children (25 – Life w/o Parole)

It should be understood that though many of these offenses carry mandatory minimum jail sentences, virtually every offense other than Murder has provisions whereby sentence may be probated or suspended for community supervision (probation).

Other points:

There are some offenses referred to as “hybrid” offenses which mean they can straddle boundaries of punishment — but for the most part the levels remain fairly consistent.  Some offenses like Driving While Intoxicated raise the minimum punishment level but are still considered to be in that general category.

Also many offenses are subject to what are known as enhancements.  Enhancements are other surrounding factors that can enhance — or increase the base punishment level for certain offenses.  The enhancement can be for something surrounding the transaction (like possession of drugs in a drug free zone), or as is often the case because of prior criminal history.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas. Nothing in this article is intended to be legal advice.  For legal advice about any specific issue you should consult an attorney directly.