When Police File a Case “At Large”

April 28, 2020

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

I’m writing this blog in the middle of the COVID-19 shutdown.  We’re seeing lots of cases handled “at large” these days.

What “At Large” Means in a Criminal Case

The Court has to have some way to make sure people come and face charges, win, lose or draw.  If criminal cases were voluntary, no one would come to court.  That way of securing attendance is the threat of jail.

An arrest is normally the very first legal action taken against a person.  A bond is set and if the bond is paid the person is released.  Formal charges come some time later – but prior to the running of the statute of limitations (2 years on a misdemeanor, 3 years on most felonies).

When a case is filed “at large” the arrest is skipped temporarily.  Once the formal charges are filed either in a misdemeanor or a felony an arrest warrant is triggered.

Why We’re Seeing So Many “At Large” Cases

Police and the Sheriff’s office want to keep the jail as unpopulated as possible during the COVID crisis.  It is law enforcement’s way of deferring an arrest and a jailing until later.

What Happens Next?

If someone has been told a case would be filed “at large,” then there is a good chance the police have or will forward a police report to the District Attorney’s Office.  The District Attorney’s office will review the report — and assuming they view the report as complete — they will typically file formal charges.  In a misdemeanor case it is called an “information” and in a felony the Grand Jury Meets and if they agree — the file what is called an indictment.  Both will trigger the arrest warrant.

If There is an Arrest Warrant Coming, What Do I Do?

It is always the better practice to be in control of the process by monitoring the active warrant filings and ultimately surrender yourself.  Prepare to post bond.  It’s also time to talk with a lawyer about your long term legal defense and how to best address the charges.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization.  He was recognized by Thomson Reuters as a Texas Super Lawyer in 2019.


Why Does My Lawyer Keep Continuing My Case?

November 12, 2019

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

(972) 369-0577

www.rosenthalwadas.com

It could be taking extra time to prepare.  It could be strategy.  It could be a red flag.

Taking Extra Time to Prepare

Your Lawyer should always obey “the carpenter’s rule.”  Measure twice, cut once.

Some cases are just harder and more complex than others.

A sexual assault at a party with 8 witnesses (each with different accounts) takes some time to prepare.  The prosecutor may be extremely dug in and there could be some complex legal issues as well.

A white-collar securities scheme with 3,400 documents to pour through can be tough too.  Federal drug conspiracies where the lawyer gets a few hundred hours of wire-tap phone calls obviously take a while too.

These are all really valid reasons for delay.

Delay for Strategy

I’ve delayed cases for strategical reasons.  It could be because my client has other pending legal matters which I’d like to get resolved first.  It might be because I’m trying to expunge records in one county and I have to do so before my client’s case goes to trial in another county.  A lawyer could even have a case delayed so their client can stay in the local jail with air conditioning during the summer knowing when the case was over they still had to go back to their prison unit without AC (I’m not saying I’ve done this and I’m not saying I haven’t, either!)

Sometimes it’s the Prosecution’s Fault

Sometimes the State isn’t ready.  They need to do more investigation and/or preparation for their case to go to trial as well and the Judge allows them leeway the same way they allow us leeway.  Lab testing blood in DWI cases and drugs can take months and months.  It’s the speed of government.

When are Repeated Continuances a Red Flag?

Every case is it’s own snowflake.  That said, if you have a relatively common  case such as a DWI, assault, or drug charge and your lawyer is delaying, delaying, and delaying and the reasons don’t make sense — it could be something to become concerned about.

DWI, assault, drug and theft charges are extremely common and we handle lots of them.  We know what we’re looking for to defend the cases and we’re quick to find and ferret-out the important issues.  There are very few legal issues in Driving While Intoxicated cases, for instance, we haven’t seen before or know exactly where to look for the answer.

Many lawyers are simply over-worked.  They use time poorly and “borrow from peter to pay paul” with their time.  They are used to putting out the hottest fire every day — and when that case isn’t your case — you get to wait.  Also many lawyers can get “paralysis by analysis.”  That is they just can’t make a decision and they use delay because they can’t figure things out.

Bottom Line

I should add many clients are okay with a slow pace in which case we accommodate this.  It makes me think of when I was waiting for my bar results.  I had a great time not knowing one way or another for 3 months.  I just don’t like going to court and not accomplishing anything.  I do see lawyers who just pass, and pass, and pass their cases over and over and I don’t get it.  The courts do push lawyers to get cases through… but rarely should it get to that point.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization.  He was designated as a Super Lawyer in 2019 by Thomson Reuters.

 

 

 


10 Principles of Defending People: (#5 All Eyes are Equal & #4 Know the Enemy)

June 6, 2018

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

I’m going over to me what are the top ten principles of defending people.  To recap the list so far:

#5 All Eyes are Equal:

People don’t trust themselves or their own judgment for some reason.  Lawyers included.

Maverick trusted himself.  He hit the brakes and the MIG flew right by.  He had cunning, creativity, and self-assurance to know the maneuver would work.  The fact it hadn’t been done before didn’t bother him.

What I like about Maverick is he didn’t ask anyone’s permission.  He just trusted himself and to a lesser degree wasn’t afraid to fail.  I’m a pretty far cry from Maverick, but I hope I think like he might every now and again.

When I say all eyes are equal what I mean is if a trial theory makes sense to me then chances are it makes sense to the jurors too.  If I think the police and prosecutors are reaching then I ask myself why?  Maybe they’ve been suckered by a doe-eyed accuser in a sexual assault case…  Maybe they’re blinded by my client’s appearance or problems they’ve had in the past… or maybe they’re so trapped in their own narrative, they can’t see they’re in an echo chamber as in some domestic violence cases.

Too often, lawyers will settle into a conventional defense.  They are afraid to think outside of the box.  But by thinking inside the box, they turn themselves into fish in a barrel waiting to be speared.  Remember all eyes — including the lawyers own — are equal.  The big picture makes sense.

Don’t be afraid to tell the jury about the big picture.  Don’t be afraid of hitting the brakes so the MIG can fly right by.

#4 Know the Enemy: 

The key to knowing your opponent in my book is experience, experience, experience.

I remember how I thought as a prosecutor.  It helps me today.  I was advocating for the opposite position which is something lawyers do.  I remember my thought process in trying to prove-up a case.  I remember my areas of emphasis to the jury, the assumptions I’d make in each case, and the points of emphasis to the jurors.  I also remember how effective defense lawyers would attack my case.

Defending cases are wonderful learning experiences too.

Cross examining hundreds of police officers teaches you how to control a sophisticated witness who is often trying intentionally to personally subvert you in front of a jury.  Mountains of experience teaches you how to strike the precise blows you need to inflict with your questioning without picking losing battles, having your message bogged down, or looking like a jerk.

Experience also teaches you the prosecutor’s playbook.  Prosecutors across the state share practices and training (as do defense lawyers) so it’s not uncommon to see the same techniques and arguments in different counties.  An experienced defense lawyer needs to know what is coming and how to neutralize, spoil, or blow-up certain tactics they ought to expect are coming.  It’s no different than a football team watching tape on their upcoming opponent and figuring out how to defend against certain plays or formations.

Knowing the enemy is important — but it can’t be confused with a winning strategy.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas.

 

 

 


Quick Chart of Texas Sex Offender Registration Crimes

May 17, 2018

By Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

Chapter 62 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure governs sex offender registration.  Since it reads like any other government code — I’ve listed them in an easier to digest manner and provided links where the law gets really tricky:

Lifetime Registration:

  • Continuous Sexual Abuse of a Young Child Children
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child
  • Indecency with a child (by contact)
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault
  • Sexual Assault
  • Possession of Child Pornography
  • Promotion of Child Pornography
  • Sexual performance of a child
  • Trafficking offenses in certain circumstances
  • Burglary with intent to commit sex crime
  • Compelling prostitution of a child younger than 18
  • Unlawful restraint of child under 17 when already registering
  • Prohibited sexual conduct (incest)
  • Federal offense or offense from other state which is substantially similar

10 Year Registration

  • Indecency with a child (by exposure)
  • Unlawful restraint of a child under 17
  • Online solicitation of a minor
  • Prostitution (hiring prostitute under 18)
  • Indecent Exposure, 2nd Offense (must be convictions, not deferred)
  • Federal offense or state offense from another state with is substantially similar

*Deferred adjudication will trigger registration unless otherwise listed above.

**Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas. For legal advice about any situation you should contact an attorney directly.

 

 

 

 


Indecent Exposure

December 30, 2010

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

(972) 369-0577

www.rosenthalwadas.com

There are very few allegations more humiliating than indecent exposure.

Texas Penal Code 21.08 governs Indecent Exposure and that statute holds, “A person commits an offense if he exposes his anus or any part of his genitals with intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person, and he is reckless about whether another is present who will be offended or alarmed by his act.”

Though indecent exposure is a relatively minor charge, a class b misdemeanor, it can have stigmatizing long-term effects.  Additionally, multiple indecent exposure convictions can result in sex offender registration under Chapter 62 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure.  As such — any indecent exposure charge is an extremely serious one!

Indecent exposure allegations are highly fact and evidence intensive.  Furthermore these cases are highly subjective.  Fighting these charges requires an aggressive attorney that is an experienced trial lawyer and is extremely thorough with the facts.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas. Nothing in this article is intended to be legal advice.  For legal advice about any specific situation, you should consult an attorney directly.